Farm To Table | Sides & Casseroles

Canning Beets | How to can beets

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Canning beets at home is super easy. These will be the best tasting beets you’ve ever found in a can! Sweet, tender and perfect for a quick side.

Whole beets in jars with fresh beets on side.Pin
How to Can Beets

Beets. They are one of those vegetables that folks either love or hate. There is no in between.

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Up until a few years ago, we were in the hate camp. But having tried them again, we’ve moved over to the love the camp. Small beets are tender, juicy and sweet. Especially if you grow them yourself or buy them at a farm stands.

Important note: Beets are a low acid vegetable and must be pressure canned. You cannot use a water bath canner for this recipe!

New to canning? Start with our comprehensive article on “How to Can Everything“. It will walk you through all of the dos and don’ts related to canning.

Types of beets

Red beets– Red beets are the most popular beets. They can be found at most farmer’s markets and farm stands. Once cooked, they have a deep red color and an earthy flavor.

These are the strongest tasting beets. There are also bicolor beets like Chioggia which, when sliced, has concentric white and red rings.

Red beets may bleach out some of their color when canned but it does not affect the flavor. Only the presentation.

Golden beets– Golden beets are yellow or gold. They are a bit harder to find but you can access them occasionally. Golden beets have a more mild beet flavor.

White beets– Still harder yet to source are the white beets. They can only occasionally be found at farm stands. They have a very mild flavor and are very versatile. Their taste is brighter and not as earthy as red beets. If you’d like to can white beets, we suggest growing your own.

What you need

Note: This is the only recipe that you can use to make beets shelf stable. Pickled beets are not shelf stable. They must be stored in the refrigerator for long term storage.

Beets and salt on white board.Pin
Ingredients needed for canning beets.

Quality of beets to choose

Choose beets that are small. The perfect size to can whole are one to two inch diameter beets. These will be the most tender.

Beets over three inches tend to be fibrous and are better suited for beet puree and the like.

Any beets that are over 2 inch diameter should be canned cubed or sliced. Larger slices can be cut in half so that they fit in the jars.

Don’t discard the beet tops. They are edible and quite delicious. Use them anywhere you would use kale or spinach. They have lots of health benefits.

How many do you need?

For each pint of canned beets you need about 1½ pounds of beets. For each quart, you’ll need about 3 pounds.

A canner load of 9 pints requires 13½ pound of beets. A canner load of 7 quarts requires about 21 pounds.

How to can beets

Step One

Cut tops off of beets leaving at least one inch of stem. This will prevent bleeding.

Wash and scrub beets well.

Place in a large pot, large enough to fit them. Barely cover with water.

Bring to boil. Boil for 15-25 minutes, until skins slip off easily.

Remove them with a slotted spoon or drain the contents of the pot with a colander.

Washing beets in colander.Pin
Wash and scrub beets well.

Step Two

Keep them warm in a covered pot or bowl.

Allow beets to cool enough to handle.

Slice off stem end.

Slicing off the stem end of a beet.Pin
Slice off stem end.

Pro tip: Wear gloves. The beet juice will stain your hands.

Step Three

Slice off root end.

Slicing off root end of a beet.Pin
Slice off the root end.

Step Four

Slip the peels off with your fingers. If you run into stubborn spots, scrape them with a paring knife.

Peeling the beet.Pin
Slip skin off with your fingers.

Step Five

Place peeled beets in a covered bowl to keep warm.

Peeled beets in a bowl.Pin
Keep beets warm in a covered bowl.

Step Six

Add beets to jars using your canning funnel to keep the jar clean. Pour fresh boiling water over them. (don’t use the water that you cooked the beets in.)

Leave 1-inch headspace.

Beets added to jar.Pin
Add beets to clean jar. Cover with water.

Step Seven

Add salt, if desired, before or after jars or loaded.

Salt added to jar.Pin
Add salt if desired.

Step Eight

Remove air bubbles with bubble removal tool or a plastic or wooden chopstick.

Wooden chopstick removing bubbles from jar.Pin
Remove air bubbles with bubble remover.

Step Nine

Wipe the rims of the jars with a clean damp paper towel or damp cloth to remove debris.

Wiping the rim of the jar clean.Pin
Wipe rims with a clean, damp paper towel.

Step Ten- Adjust lids. Screw on band fingertip tight. Add jars to canning pot with spacer rack insert added.

Step Eleven- Seal the pressure canner. Turn on the burner. Bring to a boil and allow the pot to vent for a full ten minutes.

Step Twelve- Then add the weighted or dial gauge pressure regulator. Bring the pressure up to specified pressure (psi) and maintain it there. See pressure recommendations in recipe notes below.

Step Thirteen- Process for the specified times as per the recipe instructions. Always set a timer. (see times in recipe below)

Step Fourteen- Keep an eye on your pressure and make sure that you do not drop below the specified pressure at any time during the canning process. If your pressures drops below the correct pressure, restart your timer.

Once time is up, remove the pot from the heat source. Let pressure naturally release from the pot. Carefully remove lid.

Allow jars to sit in the canning pot for about 5 minutes to cool down slowly. Then remove them from the canner with your jar lifter. Place them on a towel on your kitchen counter.

Let them fully cool. After 12-24 hours, check to make sure the jars are sealed. Press down in the center of the lid. If the lid flexes up or down, the jar hasn’t sealed and will need to be refrigerated and used first.

You can re-can them with a new lid, if you’d like.

New to canning? Start with our comprehensive article on “How to Can Everything“. It will walk you through all of the dos and don’ts related to canning.

Jars of whole and sliced beets on a white background.
Pin

How to store canned beets

Store canned beets in a cool, dark area of your home. A root cellar is great if you have one.

Beets are safe to eat for at least a year. They may last longer but it’s best to try to use them up within a year.

How to use canned beets

Use canned beets in salads, soups, stews and the like. The taste of these freshly canned beets will sparkle.

Beet Puree
Beet puree is a great way to add some color to otherwise bland looking foods! It pairs well with seafood, fish, duck and chicken! So easy and vegan!
Make This
beet puree garnished with parsley.Pin

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I hope you enjoyed the recipe today.

Enjoy. And have fun cooking!

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Sliced beets in a pint canning jar.Pin

Canning Beets

Canning beets at home is super easy. These will be the best tasting beets you’ve ever found in a can! Sweet, tender and perfect for a quick side.
See Step by Step Photos Above!Most of our recipes have step by step photos and videos! Also helpful tips so that you can make it perfectly the first time and every time! Scroll up to see them!
5 from 1 vote
Print Pin Rate
Course: Side Dish
Cuisine: American
Prep Time: 30 minutes
Cook Time: 30 minutes
processing time: 30 minutes
Total Time: 1 hour 30 minutes
Servings: 2 quarts
Calories: 585kcal
Author: Beth Neels
Cost: $5

Ingredients

  • 6 pounds beets
  • 2 teaspoons salt optional

Instructions

  • Cut tops off of beets leaving at least one inch of stem. This will prevent bleeding.
  • Wash and scrub beets well.
  • Place in a large pot, large enough to fit them. Barely cover with water.
  • Bring to boil. Boil for 15-25 minutes, until skins slip off easily.
  • Remove them with a slotted spoon or drain pot with a colander. Keep them warm in a covered pot or bowl.
  • Allow beets to cool enough to just to handle. Slice off stem end. Slice off root end.
  • Slip the peels off with your fingers. If you run into stubborn spots, scrape them with a paring knife.
  • Place peeled beets in a covered bowl to keep warm.
  • Place beets in jars using your canning funnel to keep the jar clean. Pour fresh boiling water over them. (don’t use the water that you cooked the beets in.) Leave 1-inch headspace.
  • Add salt, if desired, before or after jars or loaded.
  • Remove air bubbles with bubble removal tool or a plastic or wooden chopstick.
  • Wipe the rims of the jars with a clean damp paper towel or damp cloth to remove debris.
  • Adjust lids. Screw on band fingertip tight. Add jars to canning pot with spacer rack insert added
  • Seal the pressure canner. Turn on burner and allow the pot to vent for a full ten minutes.
  • Then add the weighted or dial gauge pressure regulator. Bring the pressure up to specified pressure (psi) and maintain it there.
  • Process for the specified times as per the recipe instructions. Always set a timer. (see times in recipe notes below)
  • Keep an eye on your pressure and make sure that you do not drop below the specified pressure at any time during the canning process. If your pressures drops below the correct pressure, restart your timer.
  • Once time is up, remove the pot from the heat source. Let pressure naturally release from the pot. Remove lid.
  • Allow jars to sit in the canning pot for about 5 minutes to cool down slowly. Then remove them from the pot with your jar lifter. Place them on a towel on your kitchen counter.
  • Let them fully cool. After 12-24 hours, check to make sure the jars are sealed. Press down in the center of the lid. If the lid flexes up or down, the jar hasn’t sealed and with need to be refrigerated and used first.
See all of my favorite tools and gift ideas on my New Amazon Store!Check out Binky’s Amazon Store!

Notes

Choose beets that are small. The perfect size to can whole are one to two inch diameter beets. These will be the most tender.
Beets over three inches tend to be fibrous and are better suited for beet puree and the like.
Any beets that are over 2 inch diameter should be canned cubed or sliced. Any larger slices can be cut in half so that they fit in the jars.
Don’t discard the beet tops. They are edible and quite delicious. Use them anywhere you would use kale or spinach. They have lots of health benefits.
Wear food safe gloves to protect your skin from stains.
Altitude Adjustment for Canning Beets
Dial Gauge canner Pints – 30 minutes Quarts- 35 minutes
0-2000 feet above sea level                      11 pounds per square inch
2001-4000 feet above sea level               12 psi   
4001-6000 feet above sea level               13 psi
6000+ feet above sea level                       14 psi
Weighted-gauge canner Pints- 30 minutes Quarts- 35 minutes
1-1000 feet above sea level                       10 psi
1000+ feet above sea level                        15 psi
How long will canned beets last?
Canned beets are best stored in a cool, dark area of your home. They are good for about a year. They may last longer but it’s best to try to use them within a year. 
See article above for more important tips and tricks.

Nutrition

Serving: 1quart | Calories: 585kcal | Carbohydrates: 130g | Protein: 22g | Fat: 2g | Saturated Fat: 0.4g | Polyunsaturated Fat: 1g | Monounsaturated Fat: 0.4g | Sodium: 3387mg | Potassium: 4423mg | Fiber: 38g | Sugar: 92g | Vitamin A: 449IU | Vitamin C: 67mg | Calcium: 219mg | Iron: 11mg
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Originally published August 30, 2022.

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