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Canning Pineapple

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Canning pineapple is a great way to preserve it and enjoy it all year round, even when it’s not in season.

Jars of canned pineapple with a whole pineapple in the backgroundPin
Canned Pineapples

Pineapple is a delicious tropical fruit enjoyed by many around the world. But have you ever considered canning pineapple? Canning also allows you to control the quality of the fruit and the ingredients used in the canning process.

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We’ll explore the benefits of canning pineapple, provide step-by-step instructions on how to can it, and offer tips for storing and using canned pineapple.

Whatever your skill level, you’ll find everything you need to know about preserving pineapple in this article.

Why can pineapple?

Canning pineapple offers several benefits that make it a worthwhile endeavor. Here are some top benefits of canning pineapple:

  1. Year-Round Availability: When you preserve pineapple, you can enjoy it all year round, even when it’s out of season. You can enjoy pineapple’s sweet and tangy flavor any time, whether for a snack, dessert, or a recipe.
  2. Cost Savings: Canning pineapple can save you money in the long run. Buying fresh pineapple when it’s out of season can be expensive. Still, if you have it in the pantry, it is often more affordable and readily available.
  3. Convenience: Canned pineapple is easy to store and use. You can keep it in your pantry; it won’t spoil as quickly as fresh pineapple. Your prep time for recipes will be less, too, because the pineapple is ready to go.
  4. Customizable: By canning it, you can control the quality of the fruit and the ingredients used in the canning process. It also allows you to customize the flavor and sweetness to your liking. Also, it ensures that you’re using high-quality ingredients.

Overall, canning pineapple is a great way to enjoy the taste of pineapple all year round while saving money, increasing convenience, and customizing the flavor to your liking.

What you need

  • Pineapple: You’ll need fresh, ripe pineapples for canning. Choose pineapples that are firm and have a sweet fragrance. They should only have a bit of green still showing on the top end, near the leaves. The rest of the pineapple should be yellowing between the “eyes.” See the photo below. The fruit on the right is the least ripe because it has more green between the “eyes.” You can also try to pull the center-most leaves out. They should pull out easily with little resistance when fully ripe.
  • Water: Water is needed to create the syrup that the pineapple will be canned in. You can use pineapple juice, apple juice, or white grape juice instead of water. If you would like to sweeten the pineapple, use a light or very light syrup; if your pineapple is sufficiently ripe, there shouldn’t be a need to sweeten it. See below for instructions.
Whole pineapples on a dark background.Pin
Whole pineapples

Pineapple can be raw packed or hot packed. The raw pack will take less time and one less pan, but the fruit tends to float. We prefer a hot pack with their own juices. But you can also use a syrup.

How to prepare the fruit

Step One

Lay the fruit on its side. Cut off the top with a sharp knife.

Top sliced of the pineapple.Pin
Cut the top off the fruit.

Step Two

Place the fruit upright on your board. Slice down vertically to slice off the skin.

Once it’s peeled, slice off the bottom.

Cutting the skin from the fruit.Pin
Place it upright on the board and slice off the skin.

Step Three

Cut out all of the eyes. The seeds can be left in.

Be sure to cut out all the eyes; they are a choking hazard for young children. (Experience talking here.)

Identifying the seeds and eye of the peeled pineapple.Pin
The seeds do not have to be removed. The eyes should be removed.

Step Four

Use a sharp paring knife to cut them out.

Cutting out one of the eyes.Pin
Cut out the eyes with a small paring knife.

Step Five

Cut the fruit into quarters.

Slice it down vertically to remove the core.

Save the cores.

Cutting out the core of the fruit.Pin
Quart the fruit and slice it down vertically to remove the cores.

Step Six

Cut the fruit into bite-sized chunks.

Fruit cut into chunks.Pin
Cut up each quarter into bite-sized chunks.

Types of syrup

Quantities of water and sugar in syrups

  • very light syrup – 6½ cups water to ¾ cup sugar
  • light syrup – 5¾ cups water to 1½ cups sugar
  • medium syrup – 5¼ cups water to 2¼ cups sugar
  • heavy syrup – 5 cups water to 3¼ cups sugar
  • honey syrup – 1 cup honey to 4 cups water or juice
  • juice – you can use apple or white grape juice instead of water to make syrup.

With most canning recipes that require the use of liquids, it’s a good idea to give the jars a quick rinse before storage. Sometimes the syrup (or food) may siphon (see more below in the section ‘What is siphoning’) out and leave a sugar residue on the outside of the jar where mold can grow.

How to make it

Get your water bath canner on the stove and start to heat it. Add the jars so that they will be warm when you add the fruit to them. Note: Once the jars are filled, they will need less water to cover them, so when you add the jars before processing, be sure that the water only covers them by 2 inches so that the pot doesn’t boil over.

Step One

Add cut or sliced fruit to a large pot. Barely cover with water.

Bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Once it’s boiling, reduce the heat and simmer for about ten minutes.

Add pineapple to a large pot. Barely cover with water.Pin
Barely cover the fruit with water in a large pan.

Step Two

Add the pineapple cores to a large saucepan and barely cover them with water. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer for about 30 minutes.

This will make pineapple juice to cover them with.

Cores in a saucepan covered with water.Pin
Add the cores to a saucepan. Cover with water.

Pro Tip: Whenever you cut up pineapples, save the cores in a plastic bag and freeze them until you have enough for a batch of pineapple juice.

Step Three

Notice that after cooking the chunks, the water that you added resembles pineapple juice.

For this reason, we don’t recommend buying commercially prepared juices. It’s a great money saver just to use water.

Chunks after being cooked.Pin
This is the chunks after cooking. Notice that the cooking water resembles juice now.

Step Four

Load the chunks into the jars using a slotted spoon. Leave a ½-inch headspace.

Pineapple chunks loaded into jars.Pin
Load pineapple chunks into jars using a slotted spoon.

Step Five

Ladle the cooking water, juice, or hot syrup into the jars, preserving the headspace.

Juice added to pineapple in jars.Pin
Add the cooking water or the juice you made from the cores into the jars.

Step Six

Remove air bubbles using a bubble tool, plastic or wooden chopstick, or knife.

Removing air bubbles with a wooden chopstick.Pin
Remove air bubbles.

Step Seven

Wipe the jar rim clean with a damp paper towel.

Wiping the rims with paper towels.Pin
Wipe the rims clean.

Step Eight

Center the lid on the jar using your lid lifter.

Adding lid with a lid lifter.Pin
Center the lid.

Step Nine

Screw on the bands fingertip tight.

Load the jars into your water bath canning pot.

Jars loaded into canning pot.Pin
Load the jars into the canning pot.

Process the jars for 20 minutes for quarts or 15 minutes for pints for altitudes under 2000 feet above sea level. Adjust for altitude. (See recipe notes below for adjustments.

Get the canner water hot, and add the filled jars. Once the water is boiling, set the timer.

Once processing time is done, remove the pot from the heat, carefully open the lid, and move it partially off the top of the canning pot. Let it rest like that for 5 minutes.

Then, remove the lid and allow the jars to rest in the canning pot for another 5 to 10 minutes.

After resting, remove the jars onto a kitchen towel placed on your counter and let them thoroughly cool for 12-24 hours, undisturbed. You may hear the lids pinging sometime in the next hour. This is music to a canner’s ears. It is due to the reaction of the lids being sealed to the jar.

Check the seals. Press down in the middle of the lid. If it flexes up or down, the jar is not sealed and should be refrigerated and used first.

Then, remove the bands. Gently pick the jar up by the lid to further check the seal. Again, if it is not sealed, use it first.

Label jars with contents and the date. Store in a cool dark place.

Jars of canned pineapple chunks.Pin

Why did my jars lose syrup? / What is siphoning?

Siphoning is a common occurrence that sometimes happens when canning. Happens to the best of us.

It’s due to a large difference in temperature and/ or air pressure during the canning process. It is more prevalent when using water or syrups rather than solid products such as jams.

There can be a couple of reasons why siphoning happens, even with jars that have been sealed. The most common reason is not letting the jars rest in the canning pot after they have finished processing.

Another common reason is that the jars are not hot when the hot food is added. Make sure that your jars are hot when the food is added. Then fill your jars and get them into the canning pot as soon as you possibly can to avoid the jars cooling at all before placing them in the hot water.

It can also be beneficial to just have the canning pot at a high simmer, not a full rolling boil when adding the hot jars into the pot. Then, once all of the jars are added, crank up the heat and get the pot boiling. Once it’s boiling you can start your timer.

Carefully remove all of the bubbles to reduce siphoning. Also, make sure you have the proper headspace for the product you are canning. If a recipe calls for ½ inch headspace (the space between the product and the rim of the jar), do not fill it to ¼ inch headspace. This can definitely cause siphoning.

What if I experience siphoning?

Siphoning does not mean that all of your hard work will be lost, but there are a few steps to take to ensure that the food you are storing is safe for your family to consume.

  1. Check your seal. Press down in the center of your canning lid. The lid should not flex up or down; if it does, it must be refrigerated and consumed first.
  2. Does your food still look fresh with bright colors?
  3. Have you lost more than half of your canning liquid?

Even if you lost a lot of your canning lid, but the jars are sealed, and the colors are still good; they are perfectly safe to eat. Keep in mind, though, that if you lose a lot of the liquid and the food is exposed, it will lose color quickly and should be used first.

Try to follow these simple steps to avoid siphoning but know that you will still experience siphoning on occasion.

How to store it

Proper storage is essential for obtaining quality and safety in canned goods. Here are some tips for storing canned pineapple:

  1. Storage: Store jars in a cool, dry place like a pantry or cupboard. Avoid storing it in areas exposed to direct sunlight or high humidity, as this can cause the fruit to spoil.
  2. Check for damage: Before storing it, inspect the cans for damage, such as dents or bulges. Damaged cans can allow air and bacteria to enter, which can spoil the fruit or cause it to become unsafe to eat.
  3. Label and rotate: Label each can of pineapple with the date of canning and arrange them in a way that allows for easy rotation. Use older cans first to ensure you’re consuming them before expiration.
  4. Use within the recommended time frame: The shelf life is 1-2 years when stored properly. Use the fruit within the recommended time to ensure the best quality and flavor.
  5. Refrigerate after opening: Leftovers should be refrigerated and consumed within a few days. Store the remaining fruit in a clean, airtight container to prevent spoilage.

By following these tips for storing canned pineapple, you can ensure it stays fresh and safe for as long as possible.

How to use it

Canned pineapple can be used in various ways, making it a versatile ingredient to have on hand in the kitchen. Here are some ideas for how to use it:

  1. Smoothies: Add canned pineapple to your favorite smoothie recipe for a sweet and tropical twist. To make a thicker, frostier smoothie, you can freeze the pineapple chunks beforehand.
  2. Baked goods: Use it in baked goods, such as pineapple upside-down cakes, cupcakes, or muffins. The fruit adds sweetness and moisture to the recipe.
  3. Salads: Add to salads for a sweet and tangy flavor. It pairs well with greens, nuts, and cheese.
  4. Toppings: Use it as a topping for pancakes, waffles, or ice cream. It’s a delicious and easy way to add a burst of tropical flavor.
  5. Stir-fry: Add it to stir-fry dishes for a sweet and sour flavor. It pairs well with chicken, shrimp, and vegetables.
  6. Salsa: Make a fresh and flavorful salsa with canned pineapple, tomatoes, jalapenos, onions, and cilantro. Serve it with chips or as a topping for fish or chicken.

These are just a couple of suggestions for uses. Experiment with different ideas and see how this versatile ingredient will add a sweet and tropical twist to your dishes.

More pantry items

Helpful Tools

Chunk pineapple canned in jars.Pin
Canned Pineapple

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I hope you enjoyed the recipe today.

Enjoy. And have fun cooking!

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Jars of colorful canned pineapple.Pin

Canning Pineapple | How to Can Pineapple

Canning pineapple is a great way to preserve it and enjoy it all year round, even when it’s not in season.
See Step by Step Photos Above!Most of our recipes have step by step photos and videos! Also helpful tips so that you can make it perfectly the first time and every time! Scroll up to see them!
5 from 6 votes
Print Pin Rate
Course: Dessert, pantry item, Snack
Cuisine: American
Prep Time: 30 minutes
Cook Time: 30 minutes
processing time: 15 minutes
Total Time: 1 hour 15 minutes
Servings: 32 servings
Calories: 28kcal
Author: Beth Neels
Cost: $10

Ingredients

  • 2 large pineapples see notes below.
  • water, juice or syrup see notes below.

Instructions

To prepare the fruit

  • Lay the fruit on its side. Cut off the top with a sharp knife.
    2 large pineapples
  • Place the fruit upright on your board. Slice down vertically to slice off the skin. Once it’s peeled, slice off the bottom.
  • Cut out all of the eyes. The seeds can be left in. Be sure to cut out all the eyes; they are a choking hazard for young children. (Experience talking here.) Use a sharp paring knife to cut them out.
  • Cut the fruit into quarters. Slice it down vertically to remove the core. Save the cores.
  • Cut the fruit into bite-sized chunks.

How to can it – hot pack

  • Get your water bath canner on the stove and start to heat it. Add the jars so that they will be warm when you add the fruit to them. Note: Once the jars are filled, they will need less water to cover them, so when you add the jars before processing, be sure that the water only covers them by 2 inches so that the pot doesn’t boil over.
  • Add cut or sliced fruit to a large pot. Barely cover with water. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Once it’s boiling, reduce the heat and simmer for about ten minutes.
    water, juice or syrup
  • Add the pineapple cores to a large saucepan and barely cover them with water. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer for about 30 minutes. This will make pineapple juice to cover them with.
  • Notice that after cooking the chunks, the water that you added resembles pineapple juice. For this reason, we don’t recommend buying commercially prepared juices. It’s a great money saver just to use water.
  • Load the chunks into the jars using a slotted spoon. Leave a ½-inch headspace.
  • Ladle the cooking water, juice, or hot syrup into the jars, preserving the headspace.
  • Remove air bubbles using a bubble tool, plastic or wooden chopstick, or knife.
  • Wipe the jar rim clean with a damp paper towel.
  • Center the lid on the jar using your lid lifter.
  • Screw on the bands fingertip tight. Load the jars into your water bath canning pot.
  • Process the jars for 20 minutes for quarts or 15 minutes for pints for altitudes under 2000 feet above sea level. Adjust for altitude. (See recipe notes below for adjustments.
  • Once processing time is done, remove the pot from the heat and carefully open the lid and move it partially off the top of the canning pot. Let it rest like that for 5 minutes.
  • Then remove the lid and allow the jars to rest another 5 to 10 minutes in the canning pot.
  • After resting, remove the jars onto a kitchen towel placed on your counter and let them thoroughly cool for 12-24 hours, undisturbed. You may hear the lids pinging sometime in the next hour. This is music to a canner’s ears. It is due to the reaction of the lids being sealed to the jar.
  • Check the seals. Press down in the middle of the lid. If it flexes up or down, the jar is not sealed and should be refrigerated and used first.
  • Then remove the bands. Gently pick the jar up by the lid to further check the seal. Again, if it is not sealed, use it first.
  • Label jars with contents and the date. Store in a cool, dark space.
See all of my favorite tools and gift ideas on my New Amazon Store!Check out Binky’s Amazon Store!

Notes

Makes about 8 pints, depending on the size of your pineapples.
Each pineapple yields 2-2½ cups of pineapple chunks.
See the article above for information on siphoning or losing liquid from the jars.
Types of syrup
Quantities of water and sugar in syrups
  • very light syrup – 6½ cups water to ¾ cup sugar
  • light syrup – 5¾ cups water to 1½ cups sugar
  • medium syrup – 5¼ cups water to 2¼ cups sugar
  • heavy syrup – 5 cups water to 3¼ cups sugar
  • honey syrup – 1 cup honey to 4 cups water or juice
  • juice – you can use apple or white grape juice instead of water to make syrup.
With most canning recipes that require the use of liquids, it’s a good idea to give the jars a quick rinse before storage. Sometimes the syrup (or food) may siphon (see more below in the section ‘What is siphoning’) out and leave a sugar residue on the outside of the jar where mold can grow.
Altitude adjustment
0-1000 feet – 15 minutes
1000-3000 feet – 20 minutes
3000-6000 feet – 20 minutes
above 6000 feet – 25 minutes
 

Nutrition

Serving: 0.5cups | Calories: 28kcal | Carbohydrates: 7g | Protein: 0.3g | Fat: 0.1g | Saturated Fat: 0.01g | Polyunsaturated Fat: 0.02g | Monounsaturated Fat: 0.01g | Sodium: 1mg | Potassium: 62mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 6g | Vitamin A: 33IU | Vitamin C: 27mg | Calcium: 7mg | Iron: 0.2mg
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Originally published April 25, 2023.

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10 Comments

  1. 5 stars
    I’ve never thought about canning pineapple. I love desserts with pineapple and casseroles are the best. I can’t wait to try this recipe.

  2. 5 stars
    This is such a great idea to prevent pineapple from going bad! Going to can some fresh pineapple for later on.

  3. 5 stars
    These are some great tips for canning pineapple! Looking forward to giving this a try; pineapple is a summertime staple in our home!

  4. 5 stars
    What a wonderful way to preserve that pineapple freshness and have it available all year long! Perfect to keep on hand for snacks or desserts.

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